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to what the president said today and what speaker john boehner said last week. listen to this. >> you've said that the wealthiest must pay more. would closing loopholes instead of raising rates for them sty y satisfy you? >> i think there are loopholes that should be closed and we should look at how we can make the process of deductions, the filing process easier, simpler, but when it comes to the top 2%, what i'm not going to do is to extend further a tax cut for folks who don't need it. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable and frankly, it couldn't even pass the house. >> well, it feels like a dÉjÀ vu all over again. somebody is going to have to blink or we go over the fiscal cliff. my next guest knows all about fiscal cliff uncertainty and its effect on the individual investor. walter bettinger is ceo of charles schwab. the market certainly feels pessimistic. we are looking at another 200-point decline today. the market is down 5% since the president was re-elected. what are you hearing from clients? >> clients are really concerned. there is pessimism among investors. there's grea
the campaign. you have to listen closely to the words used by the principle negotiators. first was john boehner today, who with drew a line not against additional tax revenue but only against the idea of raising top rates. >> listen, the problem with raising tax rates on the wealthiest americans is that more than half of them are small business owners. we know 700 no,000 jobs would b destroyed. we also know it would slow down our economy. >> and by the same token, president obama came out in the east room, and the line he drew was not in favor of higher -- insisting on higher tax rates, it's that we need more tax revenue from people at the top. >> i'm not whetted to every detail of my plan. i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. >> so the keyword for the president is balanced. but more than one way to get there. maria, just before i came on air, got a statement from the bipartisan policy center in washington, which has been urging the two sides to come together on a simpson-bowles ty
think they've already agreed to that. you heard john boehner say that already. we've had voteses in the senate where we've gotten rid of tax credits. i think that's a given. and i think that the vast majority of measures agree with that. the question is how do you do that and how do you allow taxes to rise at the same time you fix the real problem and that's uncontrolled entitlement spending and a government that has grown massively. >> i think if the house stands for anything, it's cut government spending as tom coburn said and i think we'll have to do more of it. we heard the mandate in 2010 where it was a clear mandate cut spending and we did, we cut $900 billion in spending that he can't like painful tos us. >> we'll continue our call to rise bol politics and make a deal. oufr guests this morning include mike jackson and also david zaslav. and the head of maris group. and douglas holtz-eakin. >> let's talk about eurozone finance ministers meeting to discuss whether to release a new tranche of fund to go greece. the leaders are not expected it to okay the funding despite greec
movements particularly republicans, john boehner coming out after the election, i get t revenues have to be part of the deal. as george suggested there will be arguments about how you get there but i think when i look at how the politics line up the leverage embedded in going over the cliff and what that means to the president and democrats will push us there. i just want to say macro economically, going over the cliff is a bad thing, no question about it, but going over the cliff and staying over the cliff is a lot worse than going over the cliff and kind of backtracking back up there. >> the bungy. >> the bungy jump. >> we talked about that. >> the slope, the fiscal slope. >> george, where are you on the actual rate itself? there was a conversation boehner said we'll put revenues on the table, keep it at 35%, we'll find the deductions and from the president the first time out he didn't talk about 39.6 and so there was this view amongst some who wanted to hear it somehow he was at the same place and boehner might be willing to do something. i was in d.c. yesterday and others, steve w
. this was the secret negotiation between barack obama and john boehner last year. we don't know all of the pieces that were in it. they offered 8$800 billion in revenue and then on the spending cut side they offered $450 billion in cuts to medicare and medication and changes to the way social security benefits are calculated. a lot of things on the table here. big things both tax increases and spending decreases. it's going to take some combination of those to get to a deal here and it's sort of where they go on this menu of options that's going to lead to whether or not they have votes to do it on capitol hill. >> there's a detail there. cut through it for me if you will. a lot of people around seem to suggest that they're going to get this thing tied up really quite quickly. my concern is that obama is beginning to grandstand. if you look at who he's meeting with, it looks like he might be preparing for a huge fight for his legacy, which actually might push us further back than a lot of people have bargained for. >> what you'll see with obama meeting with progressive groups and business leaders
and he's trying to figure out how to get republicans to build on the conciliatory signals that john boehner's been sending. >> we talked earlier this morning about what the "wall street journal" has at the top and the story that a lot of people have been talking about. laying out $1.6 trillion as the baseline for what he'd like to see. double where the talks left off back in the summer of 2011. is this just an opening bid and we expect it will be somewhere in the middle of those two numbers? >> that's what i expect. i don't think you start out by laying out your bottom line. and remember, that's a bottom line that he laid out publicly in september of 2011 after the grand bargain talks were concluded unsuccessfully. so this is -- this is basically no change in his position. and why would he change having just won an election? but i think you're going to see some back and forth. and if question is how much revenue can you get from closing deductions and loopholes and if so, what kind? and do rates need to rise in order to get the revenue you need to make a deal? and i think what he wa
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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